Riley Breckenridge

Help me use my first half marathon as a way to raise money for JWCF and help fight cancer.
  • My Goal:
  • $2,000
  • Raised So Far:
  • $2,218
  • # of Donations:
  • 60
$2218 of $2000 goal
+
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I used to dread running. As someone who grew up playing baseball, basketball, soccer and football, running was what you did when you'd failed. It was punishment for a loss, a missed sign, a blown coverage, or whatever failspace you'd stumbled into during a particular game.

Blow it? You're running. A lot. And you'll run until you puke, because that's just what coaches do.

As a result, running has been at the absolute bottom of my "Things You Should Do To Keep In Shape And Maybe Relieve A Little Stress Because You're Getting Fat And You Actually Seem Pretty Stressed Out" list. I hated it. With a passion. That hate stemmed from the psychological relationship I'd had with it and some physiological red flags (an ACL recontruction, no MCL and a bad back). Running -- it's connection to failure, a knee that feels like it's made of gravel, and a back that makes me feel like I could crap out my spinal column at any moment -- never seemed like an option.

For some reason -- maybe it was mid-life crisis, a mild form of masochism, a way to cope with stress pre/post-work, or whatever else -- I started running in December of last year. It began with easy 5K runs before or after the 9-to-5 job, grew to accepting a Strava challenge to run 33 miles over the holidays, and has expanded to me signing up for my first half marathon in Orange County this May.

I'm addicted.

Running has become the antithesis of what I thought it was. It's not about failure. It's not about pain. And it's not about punishment. It has become a phenomenal (and wholly enjoyable) way for me to stay in shape, flush out daily stresses and rekindle the competitive fire that I found so much joy in when I was playing organized sports. It's also all about rhythm, which (as a drummer) appeals to me on multiple levels.

I lost my father to cancer a little over three years ago. I'd be lying if I said I was past it and that it didn't contribute to my daily stresses. I miss him dearly, and running has helped me cope with that at times. And when I learned that I could team up with the John Wayne Cancer Foundation to raise money for a charity that is dedicated to improving cancer patient outcomes via research, awareness and support, I thought it'd be a great opportunity to use something (running) that has helped me, to help others. 

That's where you come in.

I have set a goal (and yeah, I know it's lofty) of raising $2000 for the JWCF via my run in May. Whether you donate $1 or $100, it's much appreciated. Please know that it is going to a great cause, the absolute least of which is making sure a (kinda) fat guy with a bad knee and a bad back runs 13.1 miles in a respectable amount of time on May 4th.

Thank you so much for your support.

-Riley 

 

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My Story
The Cause
Riley Breckenridge is fundraising for John Wayne Cancer Foundation-OC Marathon 2014 benefiting John Wayne Cancer Foundation.

I used to dread running. As someone who grew up playing baseball, basketball, soccer and football, running was what you did when you'd failed. It was punishment for a loss, a missed sign, a blown coverage, or whatever failspace you'd stumbled into during a particular game.

Blow it? You're running. A lot. And you'll run until you puke, because that's just what coaches do.

As a result, running has been at the absolute bottom of my "Things You Should Do To Keep In Shape And Maybe Relieve A Little Stress Because You're Getting Fat And You Actually Seem Pretty Stressed Out" list. I hated it. With a passion. That hate stemmed from the psychological relationship I'd had with it and some physiological red flags (an ACL recontruction, no MCL and a bad back). Running -- it's connection to failure, a knee that feels like it's made of gravel, and a back that makes me feel like I could crap out my spinal column at any moment -- never seemed like an option.

For some reason -- maybe it was mid-life crisis, a mild form of masochism, a way to cope with stress pre/post-work, or whatever else -- I started running in December of last year. It began with easy 5K runs before or after the 9-to-5 job, grew to accepting a Strava challenge to run 33 miles over the holidays, and has expanded to me signing up for my first half marathon in Orange County this May.

I'm addicted.

Running has become the antithesis of what I thought it was. It's not about failure. It's not about pain. And it's not about punishment. It has become a phenomenal (and wholly enjoyable) way for me to stay in shape, flush out daily stresses and rekindle the competitive fire that I found so much joy in when I was playing organized sports. It's also all about rhythm, which (as a drummer) appeals to me on multiple levels.

I lost my father to cancer a little over three years ago. I'd be lying if I said I was past it and that it didn't contribute to my daily stresses. I miss him dearly, and running has helped me cope with that at times. And when I learned that I could team up with the John Wayne Cancer Foundation to raise money for a charity that is dedicated to improving cancer patient outcomes via research, awareness and support, I thought it'd be a great opportunity to use something (running) that has helped me, to help others. 

That's where you come in.

I have set a goal (and yeah, I know it's lofty) of raising $2000 for the JWCF via my run in May. Whether you donate $1 or $100, it's much appreciated. Please know that it is going to a great cause, the absolute least of which is making sure a (kinda) fat guy with a bad knee and a bad back runs 13.1 miles in a respectable amount of time on May 4th.

Thank you so much for your support.

-Riley 

 

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About

The Campaign:

John Wayne Cancer Foundation-OC Marathon 2014

After John Wayne's own heroic battle with cancer, his family established the John Wayne Cancer F

The Organization:

John Wayne Cancer Foundation

Founded in 1985, the John Wayne Cancer Foundation was created in honor of John Wayne after his famil...

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